Node-Red: Checking network service port status + UI status indicator

This post is about how to do two simple things using Node-Red:

  1. Check if network service on the machine running Node-Red is available by checking the corresponding listening port.
  2. The Node-Red UI doesn’t have a status indicator available, so I’ve built one

The only limitation on the following solution is that it only tests for services for services that are running on the same server where Node-Red is also running.

Preparation:

We need to install the Is Port Available NPM Module and madke it available into our Node-Red instance.
For doing so in Linux we must do the following:

root@server:~# cd .node-red/
root@server:~/.node-red# node i --save is-port-available

We need now to make this node module available to Node-Red by editing the settings.js file:

root@server:~/.node-red# vi settings.js

Add the module to the global context on the function named functionGlobalContext:

    functionGlobalContext: {
        // os:require('os'),
        // octalbonescript:require('octalbonescript'),
        // jfive:require("johnny-five"),
        // j5board:require("johnny-five").Board({repl:false})

        portavail:require('is-port-available')
    },

You might have other modules configured, so we need to add the above portavail:require(‘is-port-available’) line to that list preceed by a comma.

Restarting now Node-Red makes the module available to the flows.

The testing flow

We can use now the global context object portavail to use the is-port-available module.

For example for testing the InfluxDB server port (1086/TCP) we can write the following function:

    // Instantiate locally on the flow the is-port-available module
    const isPortAvailable = context.global.portavail;

    msg.payload = {};   // Zero out the message. Not really necessary
     
    var port = 1086; // Replace this with your service port number. In this case 1086 is the Influx DB port
    
    isPortAvailable(port).then( status => {
        if(status) {
            //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS available!');
            msg.payload = {'InfluxDB':false,"title":"InfluxDB","color":"red"};   // The port is available, hence the server is NOT running
            node.send(msg);
        } else {
            //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS NOT available!');
            //console.log('Reason : ' + isPortAvailable.lastError);
            msg.payload = {'InfluxDB':true,"title":"InfluxDB","color":"green"};    // The port is not available, so the server MIGHT be running
            node.send(msg);
           
        }
    });

    // Note that we DO NOT return a message here since the above code is asynchronous and it will emit the message in the future. 

Since the test is using promises, Node-Red will continue executing without waiting for the test response (the isPortAvailable(port) code ). So we do not send any message further on the normal Node-Red execution flow (hence there is no return msg; object) and the message is only emitted when the promise fulfils. When that happens we just send the message with the node.send(msg) statement.

The message payload can be anything, being the only important properties the title and color that are used for creating the UI status indicator.

The status indicator is a simple Angularjs template that displays the title and a status circle with the chosen colour.

Since pasting CSS and HTML code in WordPress is recipe to disaster, the template code can be accessed on this gist or on the complete test flow below:

[{"id":"1f506795.4be25","type":"inject","z":"53f8b852.885c6","name":"Check todos os 60s","topic":"","payload":"","payloadType":"date","repeat":"60","crontab":"","once":true,"x":260,"y":96,"wires":[["5d180fc7.9ad06","27e67f9b.4f9158"]]},{"id":"5d180fc7.9ad06","type":"function","z":"53f8b852.885c6","name":"Test Influx DB","func":"    const isPortAvailable = context.global.portavail;\n    msg.payload = {};\n     \n    var port = 8086;\n    \n    isPortAvailable(port).then( status =>{\n        if(status) {\n            //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS available!');\n            msg.payload = {'InfluxDB':false,\"title\":\"InfluxDB\",\"color\":\"red\"};   // The port is available, hence the server is NOT running\n            node.send(msg);\n        } else {\n            //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS NOT available!');\n            //console.log('Reason : ' + isPortAvailable.lastError);\n            msg.payload = {'InfluxDB':true,\"title\":\"InfluxDB\",\"color\":\"green\"};    // The port is not available, so the server MIGHT be running\n            node.send(msg);\n           \n        }\n    });\n    ","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":533.5,"y":97,"wires":[["3f3f8226.c9bfb6"]]},{"id":"3f3f8226.c9bfb6","type":"ui_template","z":"53f8b852.885c6","group":"44e5d7ea.043b2","name":"Status Icon","order":0,"width":0,"height":0,"format":"\n.dot {\n    height: 25px;\n    width: 25px;\n    background-color: #bbb;\n    border-radius: 50%;\n    display: inline-block;\n    float: right;\n}\n\n\n
{{msg.payload.title}}\n \n
","storeOutMessages":true,"fwdInMessages":true,"x":780,"y":96,"wires":[[]]},{"id":"27e67f9b.4f9158","type":"function","z":"53f8b852.885c6","name":"Test MongoDB","func":" const isPortAvailable = context.global.portavail;\n msg.payload = {};\n \n var port = 27017;\n \n isPortAvailable(port).then( status =>{\n if(status) {\n //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS available!');\n msg.payload = {'MongoDB':false,\"title\":\"MongoDB\",\"color\":\"red\"}; // The port is available, hence the server is NOT running\n node.send(msg);\n } else {\n //console.log('Port ' + port + ' IS NOT available!');\n //console.log('Reason : ' + isPortAvailable.lastError);\n msg.payload = {'MongoDB':true,\"title\":\"MongoDB\",\"color\":\"green\"}; // The port is not available, so the server MIGHT be running\n node.send(msg);\n \n }\n });\n ","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":533,"y":158,"wires":[["2e85d9d.cc25126"]]},{"id":"2e85d9d.cc25126","type":"ui_template","z":"53f8b852.885c6","group":"44e5d7ea.043b2","name":"Status Icon","order":0,"width":0,"height":0,"format":"\n.dot {\n height: 25px;\n width: 25px;\n background-color: #bbb;\n border-radius: 50%;\n display: inline-block;\n float: right;\n}\n\n\n
{{msg.payload.title}}\n \n
","storeOutMessages":true,"fwdInMessages":true,"x":781,"y":161,"wires":[[]]},{"id":"44e5d7ea.043b2","type":"ui_group","z":"","name":"System Status","tab":"7011ff77.15cb18","disp":true,"width":"6"},{"id":"7011ff77.15cb18","type":"ui_tab","z":"","name":"Home","icon":"dashboard"}]

The result:

The above flow and Node UI status indicator template should produce the following result:

NR UI Status Indicator

Node-Red UI Status Indicator

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Synology Reverse Proxy revisited (again..)

Work is taking too much time, so I haven’t updated the blog for a long time. Anyway a series of quick posts are on the publishing queue, and this is one of the first ones.

In February, my single disk installed in my Synology DS212 failed, after 7 long years working. It still works, but the bad sector error count is high, and can not be used on the NAS.

Anyway, this meat that I needed to replace it, and this time I replaced it with two disks for RAID 1, instead of using a single disk on the NAS.

So why the long introduction?

Well installing new disks implied I need to do a full DSM install from scratch which meant that several things changed from the previous DSM version that I had and be upgraded along as the years passed.

One of such things that changed, for the better, was the reverse proxy support using nginx and the Apache http server abandonment.

While reverse proxy now is supported out of the box on the Application portal, it only works for sub domain sites. For example If I want to reverse proxy Audio Station, it is quite easy to do it on the Control Panel -> Application Portal. The same is true for reverse proxy any other service running on the network. An example of such configuration is in this post: DSM 6.0 Reverse Proxy

What is not still able to do on the DSM interface is to map URL paths to other servers as I’ve explained on this post: Reverse proxy for URL paths. For example mapping the path /api to a back end server from the main Synology site.

Still, it is quite simple to do, and here are the instructions.

  1. First we need to have ssh or telnet access to the DSM. Of course recommendation is to use ssh.
  2. We need to change to this directory: /usr/local/etc/nginx/conf.d
    root@DiskStation:/usr/local/etc/nginx/conf.d# pwd
    /usr/local/etc/nginx/conf.d
    
  3. Now we create in this directory a file that must have the following naming convention: www.our_name.conf.
    For example, let’s create the following file, named

    www.rproxy.api.conf

    with the following content:

    location ~ /api/ {
      proxy_pass http://192.168.4.20:3001;
    }
    

    This means that on the main Web Station site, the /api is passed out to the above server, in this case the http://192.168.4.20:3001.

  4. We save the file and test now the configuration:
    root@DiskStation:/usr/local/etc/nginx/conf.d# nginx -T > /tmp/nginx.conf
    nginx: the configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf syntax is ok
    nginx: configuration file /etc/nginx/nginx.conf test is successful
    

    We can check the file /tmp/nginx.conf to see if there are no errors, and if the above configuration is in the file.

  5. So all we need now is to restart the nginx server:
    nginx -s reload
    

And that’s it, our Web Station URL path /api should be redirected to the back end server.

The ESP32 Oled Lora TTGO LoRa32 board and connecting it to TTN

The TTGO LoRa32 board is an ESP32 based board that has both an Oled and a Lora transceiver, in my case, the SX1276 transceiver for the 868Mhz band. So it is very similar to some of the ESP32 Oled boards available on the Internet. The board looks like this:

And the interesting part of this board is the new Wifi antenna located in the back that is made of bend metal:

The board also has a LiPo connector, and probably a charger circuit, since I haven’t tried it yet, a user controlled blue led, and a very dim red power led. The led is so dim that at first I thought the board was broken/short circuited, but it is normal.
The Lora Antenna is connected by U.FL/IPEX connector. Both a U.FL to SMA adapter cable is provided and also a cable to connect to the LiPo connector.

An important information to use this board for the LMIC LoraWan based communication is the location of the Lora transceiver DI01 and DIO2 pins. Fortunately they are exposed and connected internally to the ESP32 processor GPIO33 and GPIO32 pins respectively. I’ve updated the pin out for this board:

TTGOESP32Lora_wrongPins

EDIT: Thanks to Andreas on the comment section to point out that this image, while is correct for my board version (with the “3D” metal antenna under the board), the pin labels ARE WRONG. So much for copy it from the seller page.

The (so far yet…) pins mapping are on the bellow image. I’ve checked with my physical board and it seems right now. Notice that the board rotated 180 degrees.

TTGOESP32Lora_Correct_Pins

I hope this corrects definitely the issue.

So back to basics, the LMIC definition pins for using this board are:

const lmic_pinmap lmic_pins = {
    .nss = 18,
    .rxtx = LMIC_UNUSED_PIN,
    .rst = 14,
    .dio = {26, 33, 32}  // Pins for the Heltec ESP32 Lora board/ TTGO Lora32 with 3D metal antenna
};

The Blue Led Pin is at Pin 2, and according to the sample code the Oled Display is at I2C address 0x3C. The I2C bus where the OLed is at SDA pin 4 and SCLK pin 15.

Also it seems there are at least two revisions for the ESP32 silicon, Revision 0 (Zero) for the initial one, and the latest, at the current date, Revision one.

By executing the Andreas Spiess revision check code it seems that my board is using the latest revision:

REG_READ(EFUSE_BLK0_RDATA3_REG) 1000000000000000
EFUSE_RD_CHIP_VER_RESERVE_S 1100
EFUSE_RD_CHIP_VER_RESERVE_V 111

Chip Revision (official version): 1
Chip Revision from shift Operation 1

Programming the board:
The board can be programmed easily with Platformio IDE by selecting as the target board the Heltec Wifi Lora board. Probably both boards are identical.

The platformio.ini file is as follows:

[env:heltec_wifi_lora_32]
platform = espressif32
board = heltec_wifi_lora_32
framework = arduino

For supporting the OLed and the Lora transceiver we also need to install the ESP8266_SSD1306 lib (ID: 562) and the IBM LMIC library (ID: 852) by either manually installing them on the project root or by adding the following line to the platformio.ini file:

[env:heltec_wifi_lora_32]
platform = espressif32
board = heltec_wifi_lora_32
framework = arduino
lib_deps= 852, 562

With this, the sample TTN INO sketchs for connecting either through ABP or OTAA work flawlessly without any issue by using the above LMIC pins configuration.

The sample sketch for the board: Connecting to TTN and display the packet RSSI:
Since we have the OLed, we can use the RX window to display the received RSSI of our messages on the gateway. This only works if the downlink messages from the gateway can reach back our node, so it might not work always. In my case, I’m about 3Km from the gateway in dense urban area, and not always I can display the packet RSSI.

How this works? Simple, just send our packet, and on the backend we send back the received RSSI as downlink message by using Node-Red, the TTN nodes, and some code:

Since our packet can be received by several gateways, we iterate over the TTN message and calculate the better RSSI and SNR:

// Build an object that allows us to track
// node data better than just having the payload

//For the debug inject node. Comment out when in real use
//var inmsg = msg.payload;
var inmsg = msg;  // from the TTN node

var newmsg = {};
var devicedata = {};
var betterRSSI = -1000;  // Start with a low impossible value
var betterSNR = -1000;

// WARNING only works with String data
// Use TTN decode functions is a better idea
var nodercvdata = inmsg.payload.toString("utf-8");

devicedata.device = inmsg.dev_id;
devicedata.deviceserial = inmsg.hardware_serial;
devicedata.rcvtime = inmsg.metadata.time;
devicedata.nodedata = nodercvdata;

// Iterate over the gateway data to get the best RSSI and SNR data
var gws = inmsg.metadata.gateways;

for ( var i = 0 ; i  betterRSSI )
        betterRSSI = gw.rssi;
        
    if ( gw.snr > betterSNR )
        betterSNR = gw.snr;
}

devicedata.rssi = betterRSSI;
devicedata.snr = betterSNR;

newmsg.payload = devicedata;

return newmsg;

We build then the response object and send it back to the TTN servers that send it to our node. The received data is then displayed on the Oled.

The Node-Red code is as follows:

[{"id":"d4536a72.6e6d7","type":"ttn message","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"TTN APP Uplink","app":"b59d5696.cde318","dev_id":"","field":"","x":140,"y":220,"wires":[["facbde95.14894"]]},{"id":"facbde95.14894","type":"function","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"Calculate better RSSI","func":"// Build an object that allows us to track\n// node data better than just having the payload\n\n//For the debug inject node. Comment out when in real use\n//var inmsg = msg.payload;\nvar inmsg = msg;  // from the TTN node\n\nvar newmsg = {};\nvar devicedata = {};\nvar betterRSSI = -1000;  // Start with a low impossible value\nvar betterSNR = -1000;\n\n// WARNING only works with String data\n// Use TTN decode functions is a better idea\nvar nodercvdata = inmsg.payload.toString(\"utf-8\");\n\ndevicedata.device = inmsg.dev_id;\ndevicedata.deviceserial = inmsg.hardware_serial;\ndevicedata.rcvtime = inmsg.metadata.time;\ndevicedata.nodedata = nodercvdata;\n\n// Iterate over the gateway data to get the best RSSI and SNR data\nvar gws = inmsg.metadata.gateways;\n\nfor ( var i = 0 ; i  betterRSSI )\n        betterRSSI = gw.rssi;\n        \n    if ( gw.snr > betterSNR )\n        betterSNR = gw.snr;\n}\n\ndevicedata.rssi = betterRSSI;\ndevicedata.snr = betterSNR;\n\nnewmsg.payload = devicedata;\n\nreturn newmsg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":400,"y":220,"wires":[["1ac970ec.4cfabf","94515e56.904228"]]},{"id":"1ac970ec.4cfabf","type":"debug","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"","active":false,"console":"false","complete":"payload","x":670,"y":260,"wires":[]},{"id":"2bea15d8.18f88a","type":"ttn send","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"TTN APP Downlink","app":"b59d5696.cde318","dev_id":"","port":"","x":970,"y":100,"wires":[]},{"id":"94515e56.904228","type":"function","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"set Payload","func":"msg.dev_id  = msg.payload.device;\nmsg.payload = Buffer.from(\"RSSI: \" + msg.payload.rssi);\n\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"noerr":0,"x":670,"y":100,"wires":[["2bea15d8.18f88a","cd04abb9.ccd278"]]},{"id":"cd04abb9.ccd278","type":"debug","z":"66b897a.7ab5c68","name":"","active":true,"console":"false","complete":"true","x":930,"y":200,"wires":[]},{"id":"b59d5696.cde318","type":"ttn app","z":"","appId":"TTNAPPLICATIONID","region":"eu","accessKey":"ttn-account-v2.CHANGEMECHANGEME"}]

Just make sure that we have the TTN nodes installed, and change the credentials for your TTN Application.

On the TTGO ESP32 Lora32 board we just modify the event handling code to display the downlink message:

void onEvent (ev_t ev) {
    if (ev == EV_TXCOMPLETE) {
        display.clear();
        display.drawString (0, 0, "EV_TXCOMPLETE event!");


        Serial.println(F("EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)"));
        if (LMIC.txrxFlags & TXRX_ACK) {
          Serial.println(F("Received ack"));
          display.drawString (0, 20, "Received ACK.");
        }

        if (LMIC.dataLen) {
          int i = 0;
          // data received in rx slot after tx
          Serial.print(F("Data Received: "));
          Serial.write(LMIC.frame+LMIC.dataBeg, LMIC.dataLen);
          Serial.println();

          display.drawString (0, 20, "Received DATA.");
          for ( i = 0 ; i < LMIC.dataLen ; i++ )
            TTN_response[i] = LMIC.frame[LMIC.dataBeg+i];
          TTN_response[i] = 0;
          display.drawString (0, 32, String(TTN_response));
        }

        // Schedule next transmission
        os_setTimedCallback(&sendjob, os_getTime()+sec2osticks(TX_INTERVAL), do_send);
        digitalWrite(LEDPIN, LOW);
        display.drawString (0, 50, String (counter));
        display.display ();
    }
}

For example we can now see on the serial port monitor:

EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Sending uplink packet...
EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Sending uplink packet...
EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Sending uplink packet...
EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Data Received: RSSI: -118
Sending uplink packet...
EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Data Received: RSSI: -114
Sending uplink packet...
EV_TXCOMPLETE (includes waiting for RX windows)
Data Received: RSSI: -105

Thats it!

Some final notes:
Probably not related to the board, but when connecting it to an USB3 port, the Linux Operating system was unable to configure a device for the board. Connecting it to an USB2 port worked flawlessly:

usb 2-1: new full-speed USB device number 2 using xhci_hcd
usb 2-1: string descriptor 0 read error: -71
usb 2-1: can't set config #1, error -71      

As additional information the serial chip on this board is an umarked CP210x chip:

usb 4-1.3: new full-speed USB device number 6 using ehci-pci
cp210x 4-1.3:1.0: cp210x converter detected
usb 4-1.3: cp210x converter now attached to ttyUSB0

lsusb:

Bus 004 Device 006: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP2102/CP2109 UART Bridge Controller [CP210x family]

I haven’t yet tried the WiFi and checked if the metal antenna is any good, but with my preliminary tests, it seems it’s not very good.

Sample code:

Sample code for the board is on this github link: https://github.com/fcgdam/TTGO_LoRa32

Using the BSFrance Lora32U4 board to connect to the Things Network Lorawan

The BSFrance Lora32u4 II (Lora32U4II for helping Google out) board is an Atmega32U4 processor with a HDP13 Lora transceiver on the same board. As far as I’m aware, the HDP13 is similar to the RFM95W (including pinout), and in my case it seems it has an original Semtech SX1276 (868Mhz radio transceiver) chip installed on the HDP13 module.
This board is similar to the Adafruit 32U4 Lora feather, if not equal… (possible schematics for the Lora32u4 board)

The board hardware includes beside the Lora HDP13 module a LiPo connector with an 2 pin JST PH 2.0mm pin spacing connector and the power supporting electronics.
There are two leds: one orange LED for LiPo and charger status, that blinks very fast when no LiPo is connected, and a very bright white led that fades in and out when the bootloader is in the programming mode or programming is ongoing. After the bootloader exits and starts the main program, the led shuts off.
This led, as usual in Arduino boards, is connected to I/O pin 13, so it is software controllable.

Also the only way to power up the board is either trough the USB port, LiPo battery or 5V to an input pin. No other voltages, like RAW voltages above 5V are supported.

As a final note, the board that I’ve bought also came with an uFL adapter cable for SMA, an antenna and a link for accessing documentation, so, excluding the LiPo battery, the complete kit.

Starting up using the board:

I’m testing the board to send data to the Things Network and doing so by using PlatformioIO as the developing IDE. Platformio IDE is much better than the Arduino IDE, since each project has it’s own depending libraries directory .piolibdeps which we can modify and edit the library code without breaking other projects.

The platformio.ini board definition for the Lora32u4II board is just a clone of Adafruit feather 32u4:

[env:feather32u4]
platform = atmelavr
board = feather32u4
framework = arduino

As the code to send data to the TTN network, I’ve just used ABP lorawan device connection that I’ve used on my previous hand build node.

I’m testing the node with both the IBM LMIC Library (ID: 852) and the Arduino LMIC Library (ID: 1729).

After setting the correct keys and device ID, all we need is to change the LMIC pins configuration for this board: LoRa32u4II pinout diagram

According to documentation the pins are:

  1. nss (SS – Chip Select): Pin 8
  2. rst (Reset): Pin 4
  3. DIO (Lora TX/RX indicator): Pin 7

So the LMIC Pins configuration is:

const lmic_pinmap lmic_pins = {
    .nss = 8,
    .rxtx = LMIC_UNUSED_PIN,
    .rst = 4,
    .dio = {7, 6 , LMIC_UNUSED_PIN}
};

Regarding Pin 6, is the chosen pin to connect to the DIO1 pin. This pin signals receive timeouts generated by the radio module.

The connection of this pin is required for LMIC and for the onEvent() function signaling of EV_TXCOMPLETE to be triggered/fired, otherwise the onEvent() funciton is never called.

Since this is a LoraWan Class A node, after the transmission, two receive windows are opened for any downlink data that might be sent to the node.

The DIO1 pin signals the receive timeout, and at the end of the receive windows, triggers the EV_TXCOMPLETE event.

I’ve tried to use other pins, for example, pin 3, but then the EV_TXCOMPLETE event was never fired… Strange.

Anyway, with the above configuration and with DIO1 connected through a wire bridge to pin 6 works fine.

If we do not connect DIO1 by removing the DIO1 pin configuration:

 .dio = {7, LMIC_UNUSED_PIN , LMIC_UNUSED_PIN}

with the platformio IBM Lmic library (Id: 852), or with the Arduino LMIC Library the LMIC fails. An example:

pio device monitor --port /dev/ttyACM0 --baud 115200
[cortex@brightlight:TTN32u4ABP]$ pio device monitor --port /dev/ttyACM0 --baud 115200
--- Miniterm on /dev/ttyACM0  115200,8,N,1 ---
--- Quit: Ctrl+C | Menu: Ctrl+T | Help: Ctrl+T followed by Ctrl+H ---
Starting...
FAILURE
.piolibdeps/IBM LMIC framework_ID852/src/hal/hal.cpp:24

The line hal.cpp:24 point to an ASSERT that doesn’t allow a LMIC_UNUSED_PIN for DIO1.

Putting pin 6 and making sure that it is connected to DIO1 is required. Otherwise if the pin is defined but not connected we have the following behaviour:

--- Miniterm on /dev/ttyACM0  115200,8,N,1 ---
--- Quit: Ctrl+C | Menu: Ctrl+T | Help: Ctrl+T followed by Ctrl+H ---
Starting...
Sending uplink packet...

As we can see the EV_TXCOMPLETE event is never fired, and the associated reschedule of another transmission never happens, since the code that triggers the next transmission is inside the code for the EV_TXCOMPLETE event. The only way, in this case, to exit this situation is to reset the board so another transmission can happen.

So if using the above LMIC pins configuration and connecting DIO1 to pin 6, sending data to the The Things Network works just fine:

Data received at the TTN side

Some final notes, tips and tricks:

The ATMega 32U4 USB Serial port:
The ATMega 32U4 USB serial port is a bit fiddly when using it from the Arduino framework. At reset or connection first the USB port is used by the bootloader (white led fading in and out). After a while the board starts to execute the flash program (white led off), but it resets the USB port. The host computer might have an issue with this and fails to assign an USB address.

The solution is just to add at the start of the setup function a delay:

void setup() {
  delay(2500);   // Give time to the ATMega32u4 port to wake up and be recognized by the OS.
  
  Serial.begin(115200);
...
...

Using minicom instead of PlatformIO serial monitor:
This one is quite simple to explain, since minicom survives to the USB port resets since they appear and disappear through the board reset.
Against it, is that we need to explicitly exit minicom to be able to program the board.

# minicom -D /dev/ttyACM0 -b 115200

The PlatformIO Arduino LMIC library is outdated:
This is solved now. Lib 852 is now updated.
The Arduino LMIC version (1729) on the PlatformIO is outdated, since, for example doesn’t have neither the LMIC_UNUSED_PIN definition and the LMIC_setClockError function needed for a successful OTAA TTN network join.

The solution is just clone the Arduino LMIC library and copy the src folder to .piolibdeps/IBM LMIC framework_ID852/ removing the original src folder version.

Comparing Library sizes:

Using the IBM LMIC Library (ID:852) with PINGS and BEACONS disabled on the config.h file, otherwise it doesn’t fit on the 32u4 32K flash space, our sketch uses the following space:

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   26040 bytes (79.5% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:       1014 bytes (39.6% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

Using the Arduino LMIC library (ID: 1729) with PINGS and BEACONS enabled, but a more efficient AES implementation, we get:

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   22776 bytes (69.5% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        954 bytes (37.3% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

With PINGS and BEACONS disabled we get:

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   19032 bytes (58.1% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        903 bytes (35.3% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

So we get, with this last change, and while keeping support for OTTA, at least 8K/9K for program space not related to the Lorawan/TTN code support.

Starting up with the Nordic NRF52 BLE chip

The nRF52 based chips are the latest version of the popular Bluetooth chip from Nordic that has an ARM Cortex based processor and Bluetooth communications support.
Major differences from the previous nRF51 version includes:

  1. Based on ARM Cortex M4F instead of ARM M0.
  2. Support for the latest Bluetooth 5 specification
  3. On chip NFC support for device bounding and probably something else

The following post centralizes the information that I gathered to start using the demo board that I bought based on the nRF52832 chip.

The eBay,Aliexpress nRF52832 based board:
I’ve bought my nRF52832 based board from AliExpress for around 13€. An higher price than the ESP32 which has both WifI and also blueetooth, but since I really needed to start using the nRF5X base chips I’ve bought what is called “NRF52832 Mini Development Board Gold Core board Wireless Bluetooth Transceiver Module”…

This board build is based on a two boards joined together: one daughter board holding the nRf52832 chip, and another, larger board, exposing the pins, JTAG/SWD connector, power regulator, two leds and two switches. As a bonus the main board was designed for something else and so all the pins silk screen are just plain wrong, but at least the power pins and the SWD pins are correctly identified.

For mapping out correctly the nRF pins to the out pins we need to see the board schematics vs the daughter board pins.

This board schematics are here at this link: NRF52832 Module Test Board V1.0.

And the daughter board pinout is here:

Checking the schematics vs the daughter board pin out we can see that on the pdf schematics file our nRF chip is located where would/should be a CC2640_RGZ module (!…). For example on that module the DIO0 pin corresponds to P25 pin, the DIO1 pin to P26, and so on. We also can check that by, probably sheer luck, the power pins and SWD pins TCLK-SWCLK and TDIO-SWDIO are just right… and so they just reused the main board to hold the nRF52.

Checking out the board and the schematic we can see also that we have a switch on nRF52 pin P04 and two red leds at P30 and P31. The leds can be disconnected by removing the soldering on the nearby solder bridges. The other pins seem free.

As a final note, at least the board that I’ve received, comes with the BLE peripheral Nordic UART example loaded as the running firmware.

More info:Taida Century Gold Core NRF52 board

Programming the board
The board can be programmed at least by two ways:

  1. Openocd On chip debugger – But a set of patchs are needed to support the nRF52
  2. Black Magic Probe – Running on a cheap stm32F103C8T6 board – Blue pill

Both ways allow to successfully program the board and debug the running code.

To avoid making this a very long post I’ve split it into further posts how to build the tools necessary to program the nRF52 chip.

  1. Setting up Openocd for programming the Nordic nRF52832 chip
  2. Building a Black Magic Probe using the “blue pill” STM32F103C8T6 based board

STM CubeMX and multiple definition errors

So I’m using the latest STM CubeMX program version 4.23.0 to bootstrap the code of a STM32F103 based blue pill board, using Makefiles as the Toolchain/IDE.

After generating the project and executing the make command at the project root directory, I have the following errors:

build/main.o: In function `_Error_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:259: multiple definition of `_Error_Handler'
build/main.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:259: first defined here
build/main.o: In function `MX_GPIO_Init':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:240: multiple definition of `SystemClock_Config'
build/main.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:240: first defined here
build/main.o: In function `MX_GPIO_Init':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:240: multiple definition of `main'
build/main.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/main.c:240: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: multiple definition of `NMI_Handler'
build/stm32f1xx_it.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: multiple definition of `HardFault_Handler'
build/stm32f1xx_it.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: multiple definition of `MemManage_Handler'
build/stm32f1xx_it.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: multiple definition of `BusFault_Handler'
build/stm32f1xx_it.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: multiple definition of `UsageFault_Handler'
build/stm32f1xx_it.o:/opt/ARM/Projects/TTNBluePill/Src/stm32f1xx_it.c:52: first defined here
build/stm32f1xx_it.o: In function `NMI_Handler':
....
....
....

And the code linkage fails.

The issue is that the generated CubeMX Makefile has duplicated entries:

######################################
# source
######################################
# C sources
C_SOURCES =  \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_cortex.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_tim_ex.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_uart.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_spi.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_rcc_ex.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_dma.c \

Src/main.c \

Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_tim.c \
Src/system_stm32f1xx.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_spi_ex.c \

Src/stm32f1xx_it.c \
Src/stm32f1xx_hal_msp.c \

Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_gpio.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_gpio_ex.c \

Src/main.c \
Src/stm32f1xx_it.c \

Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_rcc.c \

Src/stm32f1xx_hal_msp.c \

Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_flash.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_i2c.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_pwr.c \
Drivers/STM32F1xx_HAL_Driver/Src/stm32f1xx_hal_flash_ex.c  

We can see that main.c, stm32f1xx_hal_msp.c and stm32f1xx_it.c are included twice on the C_SOURCES entry. For sure a CubeMX bug.

Anyway, just delete the duplicated entries, and now the compilation and linkage succeeds.

Happy coding!

TTN LoraWan Atmega32U4 based node – ABP version

TTN is the The Things Network that provides the required backend services and infra-structure for supporting IoT (Internet of Things) connectivity that uses the LORAWAN protocol.

Anybody can participate on the Things Network by either providing the radio gateways that feed the received data to the TTN backend that, then, delivers it to the user applications, and so increasing the coverage of the TTN network, or just use the network by building TTN Lorawan nodes.

This post is regarding the later case, the build of a simple node based on an Arduino board: the Arduino Micro Pro. So why the Micro PRO, these are quite more expensive than the normal Arduinos, but come in two versions: 5V and 3.3V.
Since I’m using the SX1276 Lora radio that works with 3.3V, I’ve chosen the 3.3V Arduino Pro version so that I do not need to use level shifters if using a 5V based board. Also the Arduino Micro PRO chip, the Atmega32u4 has embedded USB connectivity/port, so no need for serial adapters and/or supporting chips which, at the end, might lead to lower power consumption.

Right now, on sites like eBay and Aliexpress, boards like the Lora32u4 come at least in two versions: with the Atmega328p and with the Atmega32u4. Both suffer the same problem, the Atmel micro processor used only has 32K of RAM available which might be too short to be used for some applications.
This is because the LMIC, the Lorawan stack, takes a huge amount of space if using the original IBM version. A much more memory efficient version for Arduino, originally ported from IBM code, but using a different AES encryption algorithm also exists and saves a lot of memory space. We will see about that. The great advantage of these boards is they also have connection and charger for a LiPo battery, so in reality all we need is to add sensors, battery and our code. An example of such board is the BSFrance Lora32u4 board.

The node build:
While I’m waiting for my Atmega32U4 based Lora32u4 board, I’m using an Hoperf RFM95 radio soldered on board/shield designed for the Wemos ESP8266: Wemos RFM95 Lora shield. this way I can use the RFM radio either on the ESP8266 Wemos based set of boards, or, as in this case, with the Arduino 32u4.

The Hallard shield as one interesting feature that is that merges all the Lora transceiver status pins by using diodes and hence only use one Arduino pin for inquiring Lora SX1276 radio status. This is needed due to the lack of I/O pins on the Wemos ESP8266 board. For this to work on Arduino we need to add a pull-down resistor to the Arduino pin that connects to the merged output. In my case I used a 10K resistor.
The RFM95 radio is controlled using SPI, so we need to use also the SPI Arduino Pins, and also need to connect the Chip Select pin.
The schematics is as follows:

Arduino Pro Micro and RFM95 Wemos Shield

The node software:
After the node hardware build is done, from the software perspective the node needs now at least another two things: the LMIC stack for implementing the Lorawan protocol support over the Lora radio and, at the TTN site, the device configuration.

Since I’m using Platformio to develop, the LMIC library is the library 852: pio lib show 852. We need to install it and add the reference to it on the file platformio.ini. Also since there is no ATMega 32U4 board on the Platformio IDE available boards, we can use the Adafruit Feather 32u4 board, which is the same thing:

[env:feather32u4]
platform = atmelavr
board = feather32u4
framework = arduino
lib_install= 852

The device registration can be done so that the node device access the TTN network in two different ways:

  1. ABP – Activation by personalisation – This means that all set of keys required to join the Lorawan network are embedded into the software.
  2. OTAA – Over the Air Activation – The network session keys needed to join the Lorawan network are generated when the device tries to join the network.

On this post we will ABP first, since I have no nearby TTN gateway capable o OTTA (I’m using a single channel gateway without downlink support.).

Anyway, the node code is really nothing special, except the necessary configuration for the LMIC to communicate with our RFM95 board.

On the ABP device registration TTN page we need to register our device, so that, on main.cpp code file we can fill the required keys and device ID.

As a quick introduction, after registering onto the TTN site, we go to the console and choose Applications. We can there create or reuse an existing application and register the device, making sure we choose ABP as the method to join the network.

On the Device EUI field, either we fill it or press the crossing arrows to generate an ID. We let the system generate an ID, and then we can finally press the Register button.

The newly register device is configured as an OTAA device:

So we go to Settings and change the OTAA to ABP. After this step we have the required data to put on our code.

Since our node doesn’t have any memory to track frame counting that survives reboots or power cycles, we disable the frame counter checks.

Don’t forget to press save. Again on the main device screen we can now copy the keys to the code:

We can now copy the keys:

static u1_t NWKSKEY[16] = { 0xEE, ... ... ... ... }; // <- Put here the NETWORK KEY
static u1_t APPSKEY[16] = { 0x4E, 0x12, ... ... ... ... };  // <- Put here the APPLICATION KEY
static u4_t DEVADDR = 0x26304050;   // Put here the device id in hexadecimal form.

Testing:

Compiling the code with the pio run command, we have the following output when using the original IBM LMIC library:

Calculating size .pioenvs/feather32u4/firmware.elf
AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   28542 bytes (87.1% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        957 bytes (37.4% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

And we can flash the firmware with the command: pio run -t upload.

The result is data on the TTN console referring to our device:

The problem… :
So, everything runs OK, and we can send data to the TTN Network, everything looks good, right?

As soon we start to add functionality to our code, for example reading some I2C sensors, our some serial debug messages, we hit this problem:

Linking .pioenvs/feather32u4/firmware.elf
Checking program size
text       data     bss     dec     hex filename
Error: The program size (28756 bytes) is greater than maximum allowed (28672 bytes)
28548       208     749   29505    7341 .pioenvs/feather32u4/firmware.elf
*** [.pioenvs/feather32u4/firmware.elf] Explicit exit, status 1

So in reality we can’t add much functionality to our code if using a full LMIC stack, since it occupies a lot of the available flash memory.

Trimming down the IBM LMIC stack:
Since our node is ABP only we can strip out some LMIC functionality for OTAA an other Lorawan features. For this we need to edit the config.h file from the LMIC library. Since we are using platformio, this file is located at project_root/.piolibdeps/IBM LMIC framework_ID852/src/lmic

We only leave support for ABP by enabling the disable lines for other LMIC functionality:

...
...
// Any runtime assertion failures are printed to this serial port (or
// any other Print object). If this is unset, any failures just silently
// halt execution.
#define LMIC_FAILURE_TO Serial

// Uncomment this to disable all code related to joining
#define DISABLE_JOIN
// Uncomment this to disable all code related to ping
#define DISABLE_PING
// Uncomment this to disable all code related to beacon tracking.
// Requires ping to be disabled too
#define DISABLE_BEACONS

// Uncomment these to disable the corresponding MAC commands.
// Class A
//#define DISABLE_MCMD_DCAP_REQ // duty cycle cap
//#define DISABLE_MCMD_DN2P_SET // 2nd DN window param
//#define DISABLE_MCMD_SNCH_REQ // set new channel
// Class B
#define DISABLE_MCMD_PING_SET // set ping freq, automatically disabled by DISABLE_PING
#define DISABLE_MCMD_BCNI_ANS // next beacon start, automatical disabled by DISABLE_BEACON

By uncommenting the above lines, our code now takes (we can and should ignore the LMIC compile warnings):

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   23324 bytes (71.2% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        796 bytes (31.1% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

So around 5KB less without the OTAA and Class B support.

So we have a bit more memory to do something useful.

Enabling OTAA by commenting the line //#define DISABLE_JOIN:

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   25048 bytes (76.4% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        912 bytes (35.6% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

We still have around 3K free. Tight but might be enough.

If using the Arduino ported LMIC library (852) we have:

AVR Memory Usage
----------------
Device: atmega32u4

Program:   18944 bytes (57.8% Full)
(.text + .data + .bootloader)

Data:        813 bytes (31.8% Full)
(.data + .bss + .noinit)

Much better!

Conclusion:
The availability of boards with the AtMega32u4 processor, Lora Radio and LiPo charge and battery connectivity, is a great step to start using the TTN (or other) Lorawan networks. But with only with 32K or flash memory, for some applications, these boards might not be the best solution.

Also the price for such boards are still a bit on the expensive side, since a discrete 32u4 + RFM95 + Lipo charger is a bit cheaper than the single board solution.

Anyway, the STM32F103 blue pill boards cost half of the 32U4 price and have double the flash size and 9x the clock, are also 3.3v compatible and so it would be great that such single Lora boards used the STM32F103 instead of the 328p or 32u4…

So my conclusion is, without power considerations taken into account, a STM32F103 + RFM95 and LiPo charger, is a better alternative than the one that I’ve used here.