md5deep and hashdeep on Synology DS212+

My personal photos are located at my desktop computer, and I have backups of them on my Synology DS212+ and my old faithful Linksys NSLU2 with an external disk.

The issue that I have now is that to keep backup times short I only backup the current year, because, well, the other years are static data. Previous years are already backed up and that data is not to get modified. Right? So what if corruption happens? How do I detected it? How can I be warned of such event? Right now I have no method to check if my digital photos of 2003 are totally intact in all of my three copies. And if  I detect corruption on one bad file/photo, which file is the correct one?

So I’m investigating this issue, and one of the tools available to create checksums and then to verify if everything is ok and no corruption has appeared is the md5deep and hashdeep programs. These are available as sources at this link: http://md5deep.sourceforge.net/start-hashdeep.html

These are the instructions for cross compiling these tools for the ARM based Synology DS212+. As usual this is done on a Linux Desktop/server machine.

1st) Set up the cross-compiling environment: Check out this link on the topic: https://primalcortex.wordpress.com/2015/01/04/synology-ds-crosscompiling-eclipseibm-rsmb-mqtt-broker/

2nd) Setting up the cross compiling environment variables is now a bit different:

export INSTALLDIR=/usr/local/arm-marvell-linux-gnueabi
export PATH=$INSTALLDIR/bin:$PATH
export TARGETMACH=arm-marvell-linux-gnueabi
export BUILDMACH=i686-pc-linux-gnu
export CROSS=arm-marvell-linux-gnueabi
export CC=${CROSS}-g++
export LD=${CROSS}-ld
export AS=${CROSS}-as
export AR=${CROSS}-ar
export GCC=${CROSS}-g++
export CXX=${CROSS}-g++

We will use the C++ compiler.

3rd) Create a working directory and clone the repository to your local machine: git clone https://github.com/jessek/hashdeep.git
4th) Change to the hashdeep directory and execute the following commands:

[pcortex@pcortex:hashdeep]$ sh bootstrap.sh
[pcortex@pcortex:hashdeep]$ ./configure –host=arm-marvell-linux-gnueabi
[pcortex@pcortex:hashdeep]$ make

And that’s it. If everything went well then at hashdeep/src directory the commands are available:

[pcortex@pcortex:src]$ file hashdeep
hashdeep: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, EABI5 version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux.so.3, for GNU/Linux 2.6.16, not stripped

We can now copy the commands to the DiskStation and start using them.

Now all I need is to devise a method that creates and checks each year photo hash/signatures, and warns me if a difference is detected. I’m thing on using the audit mode of the hashdeep command, and do each day a check for one year, for example, on Mondays check 2003 and 2013, on Tuesday check 2004 and 2014 and so on.

Two Factor Authentication for Synology and others – Alternative to mobile Apps

One way to secure the access to our Synology Diskstation Web Management interface and File Manager tool is to enable the two factor authentication (2FA). This means that we need to have something we know (the username and password) and something that we have (a mobile phone) to access these interfaces.

Check out the following Synology page: https://www.synology.com/en-us/knowledgebase/tutorials/615

For that we need to install Google Authenticator that is a mobile application so that we can get the time depended code (TOTP)  needed on the two factor authentication process.

This works fine, but what if I loose my mobile phone? And what if I’m too lazy to get up and get my mobile phone or tablet to get the TOTP to login?

In the first case, if you have e-mail notification correctly configured on your Synology DiskStation you can get an emergency code to login again. But if you haven’t, only by accessing through ssh/telnet you can recover the 2FA key to get again a valid TOTP).  The keys and available emergency codes are located at /usr/syno/etc/preference/admin/google_authenticator

For the second situation there is a solution (well two, but I’ll use the simplest one) to achieve this. What we need is to install on our PC, a trusted one, at least, an application that mimics the mobile Google Authenticator application. This application is GAuth:  https://5apps.com/gbraad/gauth We can installed as an add-on on our browser or launch directly from a web site or in my case from a local directory. For this I download it and added a shortcut to the index.html file. The application is available at https://github.com/gbraad/gauth an we can get a copy with the command git clone https://github.com/gbraad/gauth

Accessing the application, it will store the Secret Key into the Browser Local Storage. It’s not stored anywhere else so it is safe. Now we only need to get the key from the above Synology directory and we are all set. We can check if the generated GAuth code is the same as the code generated by the mobile device, and if yes, we have a backup!

Arch Linux e Cartão do Cidadão

Só um quick post para lembrar como se pode por o Midleware/software do cartão do cidadão a funcionar em Arch Linux.

– Primeiro determinar que o cartão é detectado pelo sistema:

lsusb
Bus 007 Device 002: ID 058f:9520 Alcor Micro Corp. EMV Certified Smart Card Reader

– Segundo instalar o software opensc:

[root@pcortex ~]# pacman -S opensc

Isto só vai servir para verificar que conseguimos aceder correctamente ao leitor do cartão.

– Testar o acesso ao leitor:

[root@pcortex ~]# opensc-tool -l
No smart card readers found.

Se for este o caso, arrancar com o daemon de suporte de acesso aos leitores:

[minime@pcortex ~]# sudo -s
[root@pcortex ~]# pcsd

Testar novamente:

[minime@pcortex ~]# opensc-tool -l
# Detected readers (pcsc)
Nr. Card Features Name
0 No Alcor Micro AU9520 00 00

– Podemos agora instalar o software do cartão do cidadao. No meu caso usei a versão disponível no repositório AUR:

yaourt -S cartao-cidadao

E no fim, executa-se:

[minime@pcortex ~]# pteigui

Pode-se ignorar as mensagens de erros, e o icon deverá aparecer no SysTray.

Para ter acesso aos certificados do cartão a partir do FireFox, por exemplo, bastará em princípio seguir estas instrucções: https://faqs.up.pt/faq/content/29/557/pt/como-configurar-o-mozilla-firefox-para-usar-o-cart%C3%A3o-de-cidad%C3%A3o.html

Node-Red: Push Notifications to Google Cloud Messaging GCM

The following instructions will allow Android devices to receive notifications from Node-red flows using the Google Cloud Messaging infra-structure. This is achieved by using the Node-js library for accessing GCM (Google Cloud Messaging) node-gcm.

Installing node-gcm:

We need to install the Google Cloud Messaging node supporting module either locally on Node-red or globally. If installing locally just cd to the node-red directory and do npm install node-gcm. Globally the command needs the -g switch added like this: sudo npm install node-gcm -g.

Configuring Node-red:

To be possible to invoke functions from Node-gcm from Node-red steps, like functions, we need to make the node-gcm module available. For that go to the base directory of Node-red and edit the settings.js file.

Modify the file so that the following configuration is now defined:

   functionGlobalContext: {
// os:require(‘os’),
// bonescript:require(‘bonescript’),
// arduino:require(‘duino’)
 gcm:require(‘node-gcm’)
},
Starting up Node-red and our first push notification to GCM:
Start up Node-red by using the command line: node red.js -s settings.js . It’s important and imperative that we now start uo with the modified settings.js file or some other file with the above configuration.
We can now add a function step with the following code to push a notification:
var gcm = context.global.gcm;

/// Define our message:
var message = new gcm.Message({
collapseKey: ‘node-red’,
delayWhileIdle: true,
timeToLive: 3,
data: {
key1: ‘Node-Red Notification’,
key2: ‘Hello android from Node-red’
}
});

// Set up the sender with you API key
var sender = new gcm.Sender(‘AIza…’);  // Replace with your KEY!!!!!

// Add the registration IDs of the devices you want to send to
var registrationIds = [];
registrationIds.push(‘APA…..’);  // Replace with your device registration ID!!!!!

// Send the message
// … trying only once
sender.sendNoRetry(message, registrationIds, function(err, result) {
if(err) console.error(err);
else    console.log(result);
});
return msg;

And that’s it:
I’m using an inject node to activate the above function and I can see at the console:
{ multicast_id: 9123452345452345,
success: 1,
failure: 0,
canonical_ids: 0,
results: [ { message_id: ‘0:7957832452%3676573df353′ } ] }

If you receive other messages, like failure:1, there is something wrong with your Google GCM key or your registration device id is invalid.

For example:

{ multicast_id: 5439642763222344000,
success: 0,
failure: 1,
canonical_ids: 0,
results: [ { error: ‘InvalidRegistration’ } ] }

This means that the registrationId.push value doesn’t belong to any registered device to our GCM project.

If you just receive 401 that means that you’re using an Invalid Browser GCM key. Check the Google developer console to get the correct key.

Testing:

I’ve done my basic testing with the sample Google GCM client available at https://code.google.com/p/gcm/source/checkout.

I’ve used Android Studio and the provided gcm-client source code to compile and test the communication.

The fact is that we need first to compile and make the GCM client application run at least once to get the registration id so we can then paste it on the above function.

We also can add to Node-red the registration process so that a devices informs the Node-red flows of it’s registation ID, and for that we need to change the gcm-client program.

IoT framework: Using NodeRed.

In my previous post https://primalcortex.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/setting-up-an-iot-frameworkdashboard-with-nodered-moscamosquitto-and-freeboard-io-dashboard/ we’ve installed and configured a MQTT broker and a web based dashboard to see our data in realtime.The real time MQTT data is viewed through the MQTT protocol over websockets from our browser using the freeboard dashboard. This configuration means that in reality our browser is now a MQTT client.

But I also talked about installing Nodered, but ended up not referring it again on the post in how to use it and why the reason that it belongs to this IoT framework. Well, mainly because the post was already too long, but another reason is that Nodered is not directly related with presenting data but consume it, processing it, store it and communicating with other systems/platforms. Nodered might be the central point to orchestrate our devices, systems and platforms. Also Nodered can provide native websocket protocol, if we can named it that, and not MQTT over websockets (that needs an enabled broker with MQTT over WS), allowing us to bridge MQTT over native websockets if we do not have a native MQTT websocket enabled broker.

Expanding Freeboard.io dashboard to consume websockets:

Before getting into Nodered, let’s expand our Freeboard.io dashboard to consume native websockets. This is needed because on the previous post we configured it to consume MQTT over websockets, and now we need native websockets protocol. We are installing our IoT server on a directory named IoTServer on our home directory.


cd ~/IoTServer
git clone https://github.com/Freeboard/plugins.git

We need to copy now the two support files from these freeboard plugins to the plugins directory:

cd ~/IoTServer/freeboard/plugins
cp ~/IoTServer/plugins/datasources/plugin_node.js .
cp ~/IoTServer/plugins/datasources/plugin_json_ws.js .

Now we need to change the index.html file to enable the two new plugins like this:

...
...
head.js("js/freeboard+plugins.min.js",
"plugins/mqtt/paho.mqtt.plugin.js",
"plugins/plugin_json_ws.js",
"plugins/plugin_node.js",
// *** Load more plugins here ***
function(){
...
...

And that’s it. We can now consume/display native websocket data on the freeboard dashboard using the ws:// URI.

Before we do anything with this, namely configure a dashboard widget to consume data from a Nodered websocket, we will just set up this little project, to make some sense from this:

We receive the current temperature value from a device over MQTT. From time to time, the device publishes the current temperature onto the MQTT /temperature topic.
We will use Nodered to receive the published data, and to store it onto a MySQL table. At that time Nodered will compute the mean value for all the received temperatures and publish that on a websocket. Simple, right?

For testing purposes I’m using Mosquitto 1.4 with websockets enabled, and I’m publishing data, on the same machine where the broker is running with the command: mosquitto_pub -t /temperature -m 20

So the code for Node-red is the following (to see it, just launch the Node-red web interface, and select Import from Clipboard, and paste the bellow code):

[{"id":"db4020c1.3b133","type":"websocket-listener","path":"/ws/data/meantemp","wholemsg":"false"},{"id":"39c70e78.3a446a","type":"mqtt-broker","broker":"localhost","port":"1883","clientid":"NodeRed"},{"id":"2319ac20.bdda04","type":"MySQLdatabase","host":"127.0.0.1","port":"3306","db":"nodered","tz":""},{"id":"5c60ad12.fd3c54","type":"mysql","mydb":"2319ac20.bdda04","name":"Query BD","x":524,"y":447,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["24e2e587.55d6b2"]]},{"id":"a7132398.e6dd38","type":"inject","name":"","topic":"select * from DataTable","payload":"","payloadType":"string","repeat":"","crontab":"","once":false,"x":284,"y":447,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["5c60ad12.fd3c54"]]},{"id":"24e2e587.55d6b2","type":"debug","name":"","active":true,"console":"false","complete":"false","x":759,"y":447,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[]},{"id":"5e11fbbf.b94c04","type":"mqtt in","name":"Receive MQTT Temperature","topic":"/temperature","broker":"39c70e78.3a446a","x":226,"y":271,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["38bbe4cd.bc04e4","e91f382a.016928"]]},{"id":"9817c3a7.d2627","type":"mysql","mydb":"2319ac20.bdda04","name":"Store Temperature","x":757,"y":274,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[[]]},{"id":"38bbe4cd.bc04e4","type":"function","name":"Build MySql Query","func":"var sdata = new Date().toISOString();\nvar query = \"Insert into DataTable values ( '\" + sdata + \"','temp',\" + msg.payload + \");\"\nmsg.topic = query;\nmsg.payload = {};\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"x":508,"y":272,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["9817c3a7.d2627"]]},{"id":"e91f382a.016928","type":"function","name":"Calc Mean Temp","func":"var query = \"SELECT avg(t1.value) as median_val FROM (SELECT @rownum:=@rownum+1 as `row_number`, d.value FROM DataTable d, (SELECT @rownum:=0) r WHERE 1 ORDER BY d.value ) as t1, ( SELECT count(*) as total_rows FROM DataTable d WHERE 1 ) as t2 WHERE 1 AND t1.row_number in ( floor((total_rows+1)/2), floor((total_rows+2)/2) ); \";\nmsg.topic = query;\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"x":499,"y":117,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["5438e8f2.12939"]]},{"id":"5438e8f2.12939","type":"mysql","mydb":"2319ac20.bdda04","name":"Get and Calc mean temp","x":757,"y":116,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["a3ca0282.6a518"]]},{"id":"21e6d8fe.7ab568","type":"websocket out","name":"WebSocket: Mean Temp","server":"db4020c1.3b133","client":"","x":1209,"y":116,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[]},{"id":"a3ca0282.6a518","type":"function","name":"Extract mean","func":"var meanval = msg.payload[0];\nmsg.payload = meanval.median_val;\nreturn msg;","outputs":1,"x":987,"y":116,"z":"78c46bf9.04906c","wires":[["21e6d8fe.7ab568"]]}]

For watching the mean temperature value that is published on the websocket we will use the new freeboard plugins installed previously:

1st – Add a data source:

Goto your freeboard dashboard, select Add on the Datasources, and select the JSON Websocket Push Datasource. Give it a name, and then the URL.

VERY IMPORTANT: because this is a websocket URL the websocket has the ws:// prefix and NOT http://.

In our case the url for node red is: ws://node-red:1880/ws/data/meantemp

2nd – Add a widget: And now we can add a widget based on the above data source.

That’s it. We can consume now data from websockets from Node-red and MQTT websockets from Mosquitto/Mosca MQTT broker.

IKEA Fredde desk

Just a quick note:

I’ve bought one of these desks: an Ikea Fredde. They are great, quite sturdy.
But while on the IKEA site there is info regarding the outer dimensions of the desk, there is almost no info regarding the size of the bottom shelfs. So for helping you out there, these are the dimensions of those shelfs:

Width: 25cm
Depth: 47cm
Height on the point it meets the under the bar supporting the desk table: 47cm. Otherwise height 50cm.

So if thinking to put a large computer on one of those shelfs, forget it. I have a Cooler Master CM690 case, and it doesn’t fit. There isn’t enough space in depth and height and also no space at the back for the cables. A much smaller computer case will fit fine, if, at most, the depth size doesn’t exceed 40/43cm and it’s height is under 46cm.

Setting up an IoT framework/dashboard with NodeRed, Mosca/Mosquitto and Freeboard.io dashboard

With the low cost of the esp8266 chip and boards, it is now easy and affordable to add connectivity  to almost anything that we can think of. Still if we build an Internet of Things device by enabling it with the esp8266 chip to connect to the internet, or other networks, what we can do with the data that we gather? Basically we do what we do with any data that we get, store it, process it and show it, and that’s what we are going to see on this post.

The software (running on Linux platform) that I’ll use is the following:

IBM NodeRed: (http://nodered.org/) This great software will allow us to get data, process it, store and publish it, with a workflow based designer. It runs under Node-Js Javascript based server engine.

MQTT Broker Mosca: (http://www.mosca.io/) There are several MQTT brokers available, but this one runs on Node-Js and so is platform agnostic, and runs where Node-Js runs. Also it has websocket support out of the box, which allows to use the Freboard.io dashboard in a straight foward way.

Freeboard.io Dashboard: (http://freeboard.io/) Is a great dashboard and freely available at the project GitHub page (https://github.com/Freeboard/freeboard). It allows to design and store several dashboards with some cool widgets.

Step 1: Setting up NodeRed:

First of all make sure that you have node and npm (the node package manager) installed on your distribution. You can see that with the commands node -v and npm -v for checking out their versions. In my case, and for now, it’s version v0.10.33 for nodejs and 1.4.28 for npm.

First I’ve created a directory named IoTServer where I’ll keep all software and configurations.

Download the zip file from nodered GitHub page https://github.com/node-red/node-red or just clone the repository. I clone the repository, because it’s simpler in the future to update it with just git pull. First just make sure that you have the icu/libicu libraries installed.

cd ~
mkdir IoTServer
cd IoTServer
git clone https://github.com/node-red/node-red
cd node-red
npm install

We can now run the nodered server with the command node red.js -v. I use -v at the end to see if any error crops up and also to see if any node modules are missing, and need to be installed. For example:

pcortex@cloudsrv:~/IoTServer/node-red$ node red.js -v  
   Welcome to Node-RED 
   =================== 
 
24 Feb 11:35:16 - [info] Node-RED version: v0.10.3.git 
24 Feb 11:35:16 - [info] Node.js  version: v0.10.33 
24 Feb 11:35:16 - [info] Loading palette nodes 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] ------------------------------------------ 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] [arduino] Error: Cannot find module 'arduino-firmata' 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] [rpi-gpio] Info : Ignoring Raspberry Pi specific node. 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] [redisout] Error: Cannot find module 'redis' 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] [mongodb] Error: Cannot find module 'mongodb' 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [warn] ------------------------------------------ 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [info] Server now running at http://127.0.0.1:1880/ 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [info] Flows file not found : flows_clouds.json 
24 Feb 11:35:59 - [info] Starting flows

As we can see the node modules arduino, rpi-gpio, redisout and mongodb are missing. If we are going to use them, we need to install them with the npm tool. Also the following message: Flows file not found : flows_clouds.json informs us that no saved nodered workflows where found. We can now access the nodered at adress http://localhost:1880/. If we want to change the bind address or add authentication, we should change the settings.js file. Take a look at http://nodered.org/docs/configuration.html for more information, and start nodered with: node red.js -v -s settings.js

We can now start designing our nodered workflows that receive data from the esp8266 via MQTT protocol or even by simple REST based HTTP protocol, process it and store the data payload, if any.

For storing data into a database, we can use MongoDB, or mysql, for example, installing the needed modules.

For mysql we can do:

cd ~/IoTServer/node-red
npm install bignumber.js require-all readable-stream
npm install mysql
npm install node-red-node-mysql

And we need to restart nodered. The mysql node should be available now in storage pallet.

Step 2: Installing Mosca MQTT broker

We can use several brokers, but since we already are running nodered on node-js, we will use Mosca. Both nodered and Mosca can provide a websocked based interface. This is of interest because we can use browser based websocket applications, like freeboard.io, to consume data from our IoT devices.

cd ~
sudo -s
sudo npm install mosca bunyan -g

And to run it just do: mosca -v | bunyan

For running it with websockets enabled, on TCP port 3000, just do:

mosca -v --http-port 3000 --http-bundle --http-static ./ | bunyan

Check out the documentation for more information at: https://github.com/mcollina/mosca/wiki/MQTT-over-Websockets

Step 2: Mosquitto MQTT broker with Websockets support

If having trouble installing or using Mosca, we can use the latest Mosquitto version 1.4 that has websockets support.

For that we need to make sure that cmake and uuid/uuid-dev are installed (For example: sudo apt-get install cmake uuid uuid-dev).

Also we need to download the libwesockets library, compile it and install it:

cd ~/IoTServer
git clone git://git.libwebsockets.org/libwebsockets
cd libwesockets
mkdir build
cd build
cmake ..
make
sudo make install
We then need to download and compile Mosquitto 1.4:
cd ~/IoTServer
wget http://mosquitto.org/files/source/mosquitto-1.4.tar.gz
tar xvzf mosquitto-1.4.tar.gz
cd mosquitto-1.4
We need to edit the config.mk file and change the option WITH_WEBSOCKETS:=no  to WITH_WEBSOCKETS:=yes
And finally:
make
sudo make install
To activate websocket support we need to edit the mosquitto.conf file located at /etc/mosquitto or some other directory and add the following lines, for example at the end of the file:
listener 1883

listener 9001 127.0.0.1
protocol websockets

Then we run it with:

pcortex@cloudsrv:~/IoTServer$ mosquitto -c /etc/mosquitto/mosquitto.conf
1424790588: mosquitto version 1.4 (build date 2015-02-24 14:38:47+0000) starting 
1424790588: Config loaded from /etc/mosquitto/mosquitto.conf. 
1424790588: Opening ipv4 listen socket on port 1883. 
1424790588: Opening ipv6 listen socket on port 1883. 
1424790588: Opening websockets listen socket on port 9001.

Step 3: Installing freeboard.io dashboard

We are almost at the end of this long post. For our infrastructure we need now to install the dashboard that will allow us to see the data in the browser.
cd ~/IoTServer
git clone https://github.com/Freeboard/freeboard.git

For now I’ll just use apache to serve the freeboard dashboards that is installed in my server. Because freeboard is not installed on the root web directory we need to make the freeboard available to Apache. The easiest way to do this, as long as Apache has the FollowSymLinks option enabled for the document root, is to create a link to the freeboard directory on the web document root:

sudo -s
cd /var/www
ln -s /home/pcortex/IoTServer/freeboard iot

And now freeboard is available at the url http://myserveraddres/iot.

We need now, and finally to add MQTT over Websockets support to freeboard… We are almost there. This post http://jpmens.net/2014/11/12/freeboard-a-versatile-dashboard/   shows how it’s done but I’ll repeat it here again:

1st: Download the development version of mqtt.js here: (http://git.eclipse.org/c/paho/org.eclipse.paho.mqtt.javascript.git/plain/src/mqttws31.js?h=develop) and save it:

cd ~/IoTServer/freeboard/plugins
mkdir mqtt
cd mqtt
wget --output-document mqttws31.js http://git.eclipse.org/c/paho/org.eclipse.paho.mqtt.javascript.git/plain/src/mqttws31.js?h=develop

We will now download the freeboard MQTT plugin:

cd ~/IotServer
git clone https://github.com/alsm/freeboard-mqtt
cd freeboard/plugins/mqtt
cp ~/IoTServer/freeboard-mqtt/paho.mqtt.plugin.js .

We need to edit the paho.mqtt.plugin.js file and change the line:

                "external_scripts" : [
                        "<full address of the paho mqtt javascript client>" 
                ],

to

               "external_scripts" : [
                        "plugins/mqtt/mqttws31.js" 
                ],

and finally we need to change the index.html file from:

   <scripttype="text/javascript">
        head.js("js/freeboard+plugins.min.js", 
                // *** Load more plugins here *** 
                function(){

to

   <scripttype="text/javascript">
        head.js("js/freeboard+plugins.min.js", 
                "plugins/mqtt/paho.mqtt.plugin.js", 
                // *** Load more plugins here *** 
                function(){

That’s it. We are finally ready. All infrastructure is done. We need now just to configure it.

Final step: Testing it out with mosquitto websockets!:

Let’s start Mosquitto: nohup mosquitto -c /etc/mosquitto/mosquitto.conf &

And check if the WS protocol is active:

netstat -nap | grep 9001

tcp        0      0 0.0.0.0:9001            0.0.0.0:*               LISTEN      18973/mosquitto

Setting up Freeboard.io:  It’s very important to notice that the Dashboard will run on our browser, making in fact our browser the client. This means that when we configure freeboard, we must take notice of this when filling up the MQTT broker address. It will be localhost if the browser AND the broker runs on the same machine, but for the dashboard to work anywhere we should use the public ip of the machine running the broker:

Access the freeboard.io dashboard, and select Datasources -> Add. From the dropdown box, we select the Paho MQTT provider.

Selection_055

We need to configure the data source as follows:

Selection_056

Change the MQTT server address to something that makes sense in your config.

For Mosquitto with websockets enabled, the port is 9001, and for Mosca, the port is 3000, but of course this can change, depending of the configuration used.

We can now add a Panel and a gauge to see data from the topic /data that we defined on the above datasource.

So, Add Pane, and on the new Pane select the + (plus) to add a widget. In our case we will select Gauge. We fill out the required info and on the Value field we press Datasource, and select the newly previous created datasource named Data and because we are not using JSON for data, we just append .msg at the end. So something like datasource[“data”].msg should be writen.

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We press Save, and that’s it.

We can now publish into the topic, and the dashboard should update:

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For example, in this case: mosquitto_pub -t /data -m 23

That’s it. It works fine with Mosquitto 1.4 with websockets enabled and with the Mosca MQTT broker.

Final setup:

We should make our dashboard permanent and for doing so we need to save the dashboard locally as a JSON file, and move it to the server running the dashboard to the root directory of freeboard.

After that we call directly the saved dashboard with the following URL:

http://myserveraddress/iot/index.html?load=dashboard.json