MQTT Dashboards

The freeboard.io dashboard is one of the most popular dashboards to build an interface for displaying data. Still, for supporting the MQTT protocol some configuration is needed that is not exactly straight forward. Also if don’t want to use MQTT but web sockets, a similar not straight forward configuration is also needed. After that configuration (MQTT support for freeboard.io and WebSocket support for freeboard.io) we can add MQTT and Web Sockets datasources to our dashboards, and we get a nice customable dashboard framework.

Anyway there are some nice alternatives available that are worth some attention for someone that wants a simpler way of doing things:

CroutonCrouton MQTT Dashboard
Node Red UINode-Red-ui

Crouton
This dashboard is really nice since it has something that we might call as dashboard auto-configuration. We only need to configure the MQTT broker (with web sockets enabled, off course) and add device names to the configuration list. The device name is very important because it will be used in MQTT topic subscriptions (see below).

The Crouton dashboard configuration is stored on the browser local storage, so it’s not central. This means, that if you change browser or machine the configuration needs to be done again for that specific instance of browser and/or machine. Also, based on my experience, this is rather fidly, sometime it saves, other times it won’t, and need to reconfigure everything again after closing and opening the browser again.

The Crouton MQTT configuration is simple:

Crouton MQTT Configuration

MQTT Configuration

After the dashboard is connected to the MQTT broker, it searchs for specific topics based on the names configured on the Devices list. For each device it publishes to topic /inbox/devicename and subscribes to /outbox/devicename. At the initialization phase the Dashboard sends a get message to /inbox/devicename/deviceInfo. We can see that the device name is used to “find” a MQTT subscriber that answers to this topic. The subscriber that “owns” the topic /inbox/devicename answers to the get message with a JSON description of the device parameters to be shown at the dashboard on the /outbox/devicename/deviceInfo topic.

For example, on the following configuration:

Device Configuration

Device Configuration

The Crouton Dashboard sends to /inbox/Odroid/deviceInfo (Case Sensitive!!) and to /inbox/DiskStation/deviceInfo the message get and waits for a specific JSON response on /outbox/Odroid/deviceInfo and /outbox/DiskStation/deviceInfo to know how to automatically create the dashboard. With another words, the JSON response defines the dashboard. This means that to add a new metric, for example, we just need to add on the device the new metric and report it, no need to mess again with the dashboard configuration.

Auto Generated MQTT Dashboard

We can now use the mouse to move around the tiles, but the it seems also that this configuration isn’t stored.

This is the neat part of Crouton Dashboard, this auto-configuration.

The configuration is defined on the JSON response to /outbox/deviceName/deviceInfo MQTT topic. The JSON object defines the number of metrics and display format that device publishes and automatically associated to the metric name there is the MQTT topic /outbox/deviceName/Metric that the dashboard listens to.

On the Crouton GitHub there are two examples of this, one in Python and other in Lua for the ESP8266 NodeMCU based firmware.

I have a simpler one in Python, derived from the original Python example, for retrieving and send metrics from my Odroid SBC. The code is available here.

On the example note two things:

At the all.py file line 9, the clientName variable is set to Odroid. This is the device name to set on the Crouton dashboard.

Then for example, I publish my root disk space with the following JSON object segment:

        ....
        ....
        "endPoints": {
            "RootDisk": {
                "values": {
                    "labels": [],
                    "series": [0]
                },
                "total": 100,
                "centerSum": true,
                "units": "%",
                "card-type": "crouton-chart-donut",
                "title": "Root Disk"
            },....
            .....

The above configuration means that the end point /outbox/Odroid/RootDisk will have some value published that should be shown as a doughnut chart with % units.

A bit below on the code, there is an infinite loop, that each 30 seconds publishes to the topic the available disk space in percentage:

   client.publish("/outbox/"+clientName+"/RootDisk" , '{"series":['+str(disk_usage(rootPath))+']}')

As a conclusion, this Dashboard is rather interesting and worth a look, even with it’s, for now, issues with saving the configuration.

Node-Red-UI
While the Crouton Dashboard is an standalone Node.JS based application, the Node-Red-UI is an extension the Node-Red itself. It adds a new range of UI nodes to the Node-Red available nodes that allows to also build a Dashboard, but this time, not limited to MQTT. In fact any node that can inject data into a node-red-ui works.

The UI is available on the same address as Node-Red, but at the path /ui: Example:http://localhost:1880/ui/

For example, the following flow:

Node-Red-UI Flow

Node-Red-UI Flow

Generates the following UI:

Node-Red-UI

Node-Red-UI

The UI is based on the same MQTT topics and data published by my Crouton Python Client. The only thing needed is to extract the data from the MQTT message:

var space = msg.payload.series[0];
var msg ={"value":space , "payload":space};
return msg;

And the data feed from the “agents” work on both dashboards.

Anyway, regarding Node-Red-UI, it is an all other world, and I recommend to join and/or read the discussion group for this project.

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How to get the AD LDAP DN name from an user

Some times we need to have the full distinguished LDAP name for an Active directory user.

There are at least two ways to accomplish this goal:

1st) Running the command dsquery user -name ADUSERNAME where ADUSERNAME is the name of the user on the AD

2nd) Running the command ldifde -f users.txt where all LDAP data from AD is dumped into the file named users.txt