Upgrading to an SSD, moving from Kubuntu to Arch Linux and setting up KDE

This is a single post just to make notice of some points:

My home desktop PC, was running since 2009 the Kubuntu distribution. I’ve never reinstalled it and did always the upgrades from 8.10 to 9.04, 9.10 and so on until 14.04. Almost six (!) years with no virus, trojan horses, and a single initial installation. I’ve upgraded through the years the KDE desktop since the ill famed initial 4.0 release, to the latest 4.6 release.

But things where starting to go awry… At the beginning I had a ATI 4870 graphic board, but ATI dropped support for it on Linux (and Windows) and since I had so many troubles with the proprietary driver, and to add it up I had no support for the board, I sold it and bought an Nvidia GTX660.

But with both graphic boards, I had suffered from a long time problem: I could only do a sleep/resume a number of times before the system hanged. The symptoms starting from loosing network connectivity and then restoring right back, and some cycling of these symptoms to a complete lockup. At first I thought that was due to the network driver used by my motherboard, a Asus P6T with  a Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 board, but with the correct driver for it, the issue continued.  Booting up was a painful two/three minute wait from BIOS to desktop.

But after a while I could pin point my issues not to the network board but to the Xorg and video driver combination. Some EQ buffer overflow, hanged X, and finally the machine.

Ubuntu and Kubuntu based distributions have PPA’s repositories where some alternative software and versions of mainstream software are available. I had trouble with some of these alternative PPA’s when upgrading, and had to remove them (with ppa-purge) to be able to upgrade the Kubuntu distribution. Anyway, there is an PPA, xorg-edgers,  where alternative and more recent versions of Xorg Software and Nvidia drivers are provided and that almost solved my sleep/resume problem. The problem was that after adding this PPA the Ubuntu/Kubuntu nvidia driver and the Xorg-edgers driver, after updates the X server was unable to find the nvidia driver, despite being installed, and had to reinstall the driver again to get my desktop working.

That was it. I had enough with Ubuntu/Kubuntu distributions. My bad and my issues, sure…

I’ve being testing Arch Linux on my work laptop for almost an year with great success. I’ve chosen Arch Linux because I didn’t had to loose an unknown number of hours per year upgrading to the next distribution version, and an rolling release version makes more sense. And Arch has the greatest Linux Wiki out there even solving problems that happen on the Ubuntu/Kubuntu line, and also mainly there are only one (well two) repositories. No PPA’s mess.

So I completely moved all my systems to Arch Linux, and my sleep/resume issue is 100% solved.

SSD on a SATA II based motherboard

My desktop computer has an Asus P6T motherboard. This motherboard only has SATA II (SATA 2) ports. Is it worth to use an SSD on such a board without upgrading to a SATA III board?

The answer is YES. If you have a SATA II based motherboard AND not buying an SSD because of that, do not wait any more. Buy it now. It is totally worth it.

Arch Linux is of course way lighter than Kubuntu, and with an SSD ( by the way it’s a Crucial MX100 256GB) my two/three minute boot to desktop time came down to 15s…

hdparm -Tt /dev/sdc
/dev/sdc:
Timing cached reads:   16710 MB in  2.00 seconds = 8361.40 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 728 MB in  3.00 seconds = 242.59 MB/sec

Note the Samsung EVO 120GB that I have on my work computer, that has the flawed firmware that slows down with time, on a SATA III based motherboard:

/dev/sda:
Timing cached reads: 23864 MB in 2.00 seconds = 11943.41 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 164 MB in 3.01 seconds = 54.47 MB/sec

Compare this with my desktop old boot disk, an WD 640GB blue:
/dev/sdb:
Timing cached reads: 16580 MB in 2.00 seconds = 8296.87 MB/sec
Timing buffered disk reads: 356 MB in 3.00 seconds = 118.59 MB/sec

I hadn’t yet had the time to upgrade the firmware on the EVO…

Making KDE looking good on Arch Linux

To end this rather long and tedious post, and also to my future reference, to make KDE looking good:

    • Make sure that the infinality modifications are installed: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Infinality. Make sure that you update.
    • Make sure that the DPI detected by your X server are correct for your monitor. Install xdpyinfo with pacman -S xorg-xdpyinfo. Figure out what might be your monitor dpi using this site: http://dpi.lv/ . Execute xdpyinfo | grep -B2 resolution and see if are similar. If not you need to set the correct dpi either in xorg.conf or in the Kde settings.
      In my case I have a dual monitor setup, and hence the weird dpi 95×96.screen

      #0: dimensions: 3200×1080 pixels (856×286 millimeters)

      resolution: 95×96 dots per inch

      So my font settings are:

Selection_002

  • While the above settings make my fonts look good, the taskbar fonts where awful and took me a while to figure out that was not the dpi settings but the Desktop Theme.
  • To solve this first install Krita with pacman -S calligra-krita . This will install the Krita color themes that are, in my opinion very good. And on KDE System Settings -> Workspace Appearance -> Desktop Themes select Get New Themes and get the AndroidBit theme.
  • That’s it:Selection_004
  • I’ve selected the Produkte Desktop Theme
  • And the colors:Selection_005
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